Alabama’s anti-abortion law has ripple effect on the neighboring state of Florida

The governor of Alabama signed the nation’s most restrictive anti-abortion bill into law Wednesday and abortion rights groups in Florida are already feeling its ripple effect.The executive director of the Florida Alliance of Planned Parenthood Affiliates said they have received numerous calls and emails from people concerned how the neighboring state’s newest bill may impact them. “These types of bans… we have seen an increase across the country in just the first half of 2019,” Laura Goodhue said. “These are really dangerous abortion restrictions.” Wednesday, Gov.r Kay Ivey signed into law a bill that could punish doctors to life in prison for performing abortions.Jacqui Morris-Hayes, a military veteran and abortion rights activist, said she was outraged when she heard about Alabama’s decision. “I am absolutely outraged because I just feel that we are going backwards. Roe v. Wade is settled law and women should have the right to do what they want with their own bodies,” Morris-Hayes said.In 1982, the Army veteran and her husband chose to have an abortion after her birth control failed. The 62-year-old she says she never had children and doesn’t regret their decision. “Until we have full proof birth control and… birth control for men, then how can any state Legislature make these laws about women, that is, to me a blatant war on women, and our personal rights?” Morris-Hayes asked. “I think it’s wrong.”One in four women will have an abortion in her lifetime according to Goodhue. “This blanket legislation are laws to ban abortion outright and are very dangerous. It doesn’t matter what’s going on in that woman’s life,” the executive director said. “It really just isn’t the place for a politician, much less male politician, to say this is the way that you are going to handle your pregnancy.”But a local anti-abortion rights activist told WPBF it doesn’t matter whether it’s a man, woman, Republican or Democrat. Willy Guardiola, the president of the Palm Beach County Right to Life League, said the focus should be protecting “a human being in the womb.”“A human being is what we are looking at. It’s a baby. A baby in the womb,” Guardiola said. “That’s what we are trying to protect.”He said for months his organization has worked with Gov. Ron DeSantis to “turn the Sunshine State into a pro-life state.” “I mean this whole thing about infanticide, it’s just beyond me … Part of this United States is actually passing laws that allow you to kill a baby even after it is delivered. So yeah, it would be great if Florida could become the pro-life state,” Guardiola said.But the executive director of the Florida Alliance of Planned Parenthood said the efforts of abortion rights activists across the state during the recent legislative session prevented Florida from becoming the “next Alabama.” “Hundreds of thousands of people protested, flooded legislators with calls and testified against bills that would have restricted abortion. They ALL failed,” Christina Noce, a spokeswoman for Planned Parenthood said in a statement. Goodhue told WPBF their efforts won’t stop there. They aim to protest any proposed anti-abortion legislation. “We know that people will continue to have abortions, but if they are banned they… won’t have them in the safest way possible,” Goodhue said. “I don’t think that is the future that most Americans want for their children or themselves. In fact, 73% of Americans don’t want to see Roe v. Wade weakened.”

The governor of Alabama signed the nation’s most restrictive anti-abortion bill into law Wednesday and abortion rights groups in Florida are already feeling its ripple effect.

The executive director of the Florida Alliance of Planned Parenthood Affiliates said they have received numerous calls and emails from people concerned how the neighboring state’s newest bill may impact them.

“These types of bans… we have seen an increase across the country in just the first half of 2019,” Laura Goodhue said. “These are really dangerous abortion restrictions.”

Wednesday, Gov.r Kay Ivey signed into law a bill that could punish doctors to life in prison for performing abortions.

In 1982,  Jacqui Morris-Hayes and her husband chose to have an abortion after her birth control failed.

Jacqui Morris-Hayes, a military veteran and abortion rights activist, said she was outraged when she heard about Alabama’s decision.

“I am absolutely outraged because I just feel that we are going backwards. Roe v. Wade is settled law and women should have the right to do what they want with their own bodies,” Morris-Hayes said.

In 1982, the Army veteran and her husband chose to have an abortion after her birth control failed.

WPBF-TV

 “Until we have full proof birth control and…..birth control for men, then how can any state legislature make these laws about women, that is to me a blatant war on women, and our personal rights?” Jacqui Morris-Hayes asked. “I think it’s wrong.”

The 62-year-old she says she never had children and doesn’t regret their decision.

“Until we have full proof birth control and… birth control for men, then how can any state Legislature make these laws about women, that is, to me a blatant war on women, and our personal rights?” Morris-Hayes asked. “I think it’s wrong.”

One in four women will have an abortion in her lifetime according to Goodhue.

“This blanket legislation are laws to ban abortion outright and are very dangerous. It doesn’t matter what’s going on in that woman’s life,” the executive director said. “It really just isn’t the place for a politician, much less male politician, to say this is the way that you are going to handle your pregnancy.”

WPBF-TV

Willy Guardiola, the president of the Palm Beach County Right to Life League, said for months his organization has worked with Governor Ron DeSantis to “turn the Sunshine State into a pro-life state.”

But a local anti-abortion rights activist told WPBF it doesn’t matter whether it’s a man, woman, Republican or Democrat. Willy Guardiola, the president of the Palm Beach County Right to Life League, said the focus should be protecting “a human being in the womb.”

“A human being is what we are looking at. It’s a baby. A baby in the womb,” Guardiola said. “That’s what we are trying to protect.”

He said for months his organization has worked with Gov. Ron DeSantis to “turn the Sunshine State into a pro-life state.”

“I mean this whole thing about infanticide, it’s just beyond me … Part of this United States is actually passing laws that allow you to kill a baby even after it is delivered. So yeah, it would be great if Florida could become the pro-life state,” Guardiola said.

WPBF-TV

“A human being is what we are looking at. It’s a baby. A baby in the womb,” Willy Guardiola said. “That’s what we are trying to protect.”

But the executive director of the Florida Alliance of Planned Parenthood said the efforts of abortion rights activists across the state during the recent legislative session prevented Florida from becoming the “next Alabama.”

“Hundreds of thousands of people protested, flooded legislators with calls and testified against bills that would have restricted abortion. They ALL failed,” Christina Noce, a spokeswoman for Planned Parenthood said in a statement.

Goodhue told WPBF their efforts won’t stop there. They aim to protest any proposed anti-abortion legislation.

“We know that people will continue to have abortions, but if they are banned they… won’t have them in the safest way possible,” Goodhue said. “I don’t think that is the future that most Americans want for their children or themselves. In fact, 73% of Americans don’t want to see Roe v. Wade weakened.”

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